WABC-AFS ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 2017

Continuing Education

R Workshop (2 parts) – April 10, 2017 2:00pm

Cost: FREE

To register for this workshop, please fill out this Google form.

Part 1: A hands-on introduction to using R in fisheries (2:00pm – 3:30pm)

The statistical framework “R” is rapidly gaining popularity in fisheries research management, due to its free nature, the wide variety of statistical procedures it makes available, and the large community of support. However, unlike other statistical software, R is not a point-and-click program. Adapting existing procedures to R can take considerable effort, sometimes creating a significant hurdle to switching to R. In this 1 hour 30 minute hands-on workshop for those with no or limited prior experience, Dr. Krisztian Magori, Assistant Professor of Biostatistics at Eastern Washington University, will introduce R, as well as RStudio, an easy to use graphical user interface. After getting familiar with the overall structure and layout of these software, Dr. Magori will take participants on a guided tour of commonly used analyses, demonstrated on a local fisheries dataset. By the end of this workshop, participants will have their own template to apply those methods on their own datasets. In order to facilitate the hands-on nature of the workshop, participants are asked to bring laptops with R and RStudio installed from the below URLs:

http://cran.fhcrc.org/ for R

http://www.rstudio.com/products/rstudio/download/ for RStudio

While it is not required, those who are looking for a good resource before the workshop can use the “The Very Short Introduction to R”:

https://cran.r-project.org/doc/contrib/Torfs+Brauer-Short-R-Intro.pdf

Alternatively, the package swirl provides a self-teaching module: http://swirlstats.com/

Part 2: Reproducible research and automated generation of reports using R, RStudio and RMarkdown (4pm – 5:30pm)

We expect that results in previous publications and reports are easily reproducible and built upon. In reality, there is seldom sufficient detail to accurately identify the methods, the assumptions, or even the exact dataset on which the results and conclusions are based. In addition, fisheries managers are required to produce routine reports to regulatory agencies year-after-year by updating numbers by hand, with considerable effort. In this hands-on advanced 1 hour 30 minutes workshop, Dr. Krisztian Magori, Assistant Professor of Biostatistics at Eastern Washington University, will lead participants to explore a more efficient, more reliable method to solve these problems, using R, RStudio and RMarkdown. Participants will learn how these software allow managers to keep the text of the publications and reports, the data analyzed, and the statistical code that generates tables and figures in one common document. This format makes recall and modification of previous analyses easy, as well as also allowing one to recycle and update previous documents (e.g. annual reports) by simply replacing datasets. Tips for advanced modification of tables and figures will also be included in this workshop. By the end of this workshop, participants will be comfortable in generating RMarkdown as well as Word documents using their own datasets for reproducible research and automated generation of reports. In order to facilitate the hands-on nature of this workshop, participants are asked to bring laptops with R and RStudio installed from the below URLs:

http://cran.fhcrc.org/ for R

http://www.rstudio.com/products/rstudio/download/ for RStudio

Participants are encouraged to bring their own datasets for experimentation, preferably in a CSV format.

Presenter:

Dr. Krisztian Magori is the Assistant Professor of Biostatistics at the Department of Biology at Eastern Washington University. He teaches biostatistics for Biology and Environmental Science students at the undergraduate level, as well as to the graduate students in the Department. At both levels, in addition to the fundamentals of biostatistics, he provides hands-on experience in classes in using R and RStudio to implement data analysis and statistics. He also mentors and supports both undergraduate, graduate students as well as faculty at the Department in their statistical analyses for their research and thesis projects. Dr. Magori also collaborates with local, state and federal agencies for their statistical and data analysis needs, including the Washington Department of Health, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service. For his own research, Dr. Magori leads the EWU Disease Ecology lab, focusing on research on disease vectors such as ticks and mosquitoes, and the pathogens they transmit.

Lamprey ID Made So Easy – Ah, Piece of (Lamprey) Cake! – April 10, 2017 2:00pm

Cost: FREE

To register for this workshop, please fill out this Google form.

Unfortunately, this workshop has been cancelled due to lack of registered participants. Were you interested in this workshop? Let us know and we will consider running it in the future. A hands-on workshop such as this requires a lot of preparation and setup, so it’s very important for organizers to know if it’s going to be worth all the trouble. Be sure to register well in advance the next time this is offered!

Pacific Lamprey, commonly called “eels” by tribal members and others, is an incredibly important species for the Columbia River tribes in terms of food, medicine, and culture. They also serve many roles in the stream ecology, benefiting many, many native species. Many of the so-called “fish biologists” in our region know how to identify salmonids and other fish fauna, but when it comes to lamprey, very few of them are able to tell the difference. We will give you a once in a life time opportunity to see them up close and point out key features for correctly identifying lamprey species. Here in the State of Washington, we have at least two species, the anadromous Pacific Lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) – or commonly called “eels” – and the resident Western Brook Lamprey (Lampetra richardsoni), and an anadromous variant / life history of this resident species called (Western) River Lamprey (Lampetra ayresii). Those attending will receive a brand new “redesigned” lamprey ID guide for free.

Ralph will also demystify Pacific Lamprey secrets in relation to biology, ecology, and more, using photos, videos, songs, and more. He will also provide a synapsis for the work that has been done to restore this important species through posters and other visual aids.

We (and our supermodel lamprey) are looking forward to see you at WA/BC AFS!

Presenters:

Ralph Lampman1 and Hiroaki Arakawa2 (and YN crew members depending on availability)

  1. Yakama Nation Fisheries Resources Management Program, Pacific Lamprey Project
  2. Ishikawa Prefectural University (Graduate Student)

Ralph Lampman (aka Lamp-rey-man) has been working as a Lamprey Research Biologist for the Yakama Nation Fisheries since 2012. Ralph has been working on various research related to Pacific Lamprey, including translocation, artificial propagation, larval/juvenile entrainment, and various other limiting factors.

Hiroaki Arakawa is an intern currently working for the Yakama Nation Fisheries, who has worked extensively on Arctic Lamprey research in Japan. His primary research while here are a larval lamprey predation study and a larval lamprey dietary feeding and gut microbe study.